Author Archives: pad6057

What’s in store for US Foreign Aid

Wrapping up the class and this tumultuous year, here are some links on the issues we discussed in the last sessions. It is still unclear what direction US foreign aid will take under President Trump. There is some hope in … Continue reading

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Fragile states – class follow-up

Thinking of definitions and labels: There is no official list of fragile states that the entire “international community” agrees upon. The closest to a consensus in the development community (or parts thereof), might be the harmonized WB, AsDB, and AfDB … Continue reading

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Bi-weekly roundup

The first analyses (guesses?) of US development foreign aid policy under President Trump are coming in. Likely? Budget cuts, a weakened USAID – maybe merged into the State Department -, and a shift away from many of the priorities of Presidents … Continue reading

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Bi-weekly roundup

On the tensions (contradictions) between corporate philanthropy, corporate social responsibility, and other behaviors of multinational corporations, the NYT discusses how Coke and Pepsi Give Millions to Public Health, Then Lobby Against It. Last week, Maxwell hosted John F. Sopko, Special … Continue reading

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Welcome and Weekly Roundup

Welcome, IDPA class of 2016. Since there are a few news items this week that we didn’t get to share in class, I decided to revive the class blog. Here are this week’s items: Habemus SG proposal:  the (somewhat surprising) … Continue reading

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USAID – most awarded vendors

Good graph here. 

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Evidence of impact on child sponsorship programs

I admit I am skeptical about these kinds of programs, mostly do to sustainability (and a bit maybe due to ethical reasons), but apparently they do work for the children (and a bit also for the communities) receiving them. Interesting.

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